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School Tours
Reservations are honored based on availability, calling in advance is strongly encouraged to receive your preferred date and time. The Lewis & Clark Fort Mandan Foundation has secured a generous gift from the MDU Resources Foundation which will allow all students to visit us at no charge any time during 2017.

To make a reservation:
1. Call Rhonda, Visitor Services Coordinator, at 701.462.8535
2. Provide the following information:
     -- Date of visit and arrival time
     -- Number in group and grade level
     -- Desired visit elements (Interpretive Center tour, shopping in the store, fort tour, interpretive program)
     -- School's name, address, and phone number
     -- Name and email address of contact person
     -- Picnic shelter needs (if any)
     -- Any other special needs of the group

Suggested Visit Itinerary:
We recommend a minimum visit of 2 hr. 15 min. In this amount of time, your students will be able to:

     -- Tour the Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center
     -- Visit the Museum Store
     -- Tour Fort Mandan
     -- Participate in an interpretive program

Before You Arrive: In order to ensure that your school group has a safe, enjoyable and educational trip to the Interpretive Center and Fort Mandan, we ask that you prepare for your visit in the following ways:

1. Be familiar with the sites. If possible, visit the Interpretive Center and Fort Mandan and explore for yourself before bringing your class.
2. Introduce the story of the Lewis & Clark Expedition in class prior to your visit, such as with resources from educationworld.com
3. Ask for suggestions from your students. What do they expect to see and do? If they can help design their visit and have an investment in it, their experience will be more memorable.
4. Divide large groups into 25-30 students. This will help maximize their exposure when touring and viewing exhibits. We recommend one teacher or chaperone accompanying every 10-12 students. Plan to actively participate in your students' educational experiences and help monitor their presence in our museum stores.
5. Schedule a minimum of 2 hours and 15 minutes for your visit. See the sample schedule below.
6. Picnic shelters are available for you to use for lunch breaks. Food and drink are not allowed in exhibit areas.

Cost: Free throughout 2017! The Lewis & Clark Fort Mandan Foundation has secured a generous gift from the MDU Resources Foundation which covers students', chaperones' and teachers' admissions.

Arrival: Please check in at either the Interpretive Center or the Fort Mandan Visitor Center, depending on your trip itinerary. You should arrive shortly before your scheduled time so students can use the restrooms. Since daily schedules can become quite tight, late arrival could result in your students missing out on some of their planned activities.

Tours: Your group will be accompanied through the exhibit areas of the Interpretive Center and Fort Mandan by our friendly and knowledgeable staff. 

Additional Programming: On-site interpretive programs offered by our interpretive staff will be a valuable part of your field trip experience. You may choose one of the following:

-- Native Sports With reproduction sports equipment, kids will get to play the same games that American Indians played in today's North Dakota hundreds of years ago! In the process they will gain insights into everyday life at the time.

-- The Fur Trade Game What awaited you if you joined the fur trade at Fort Clark? In this fun and educational game, kids draw cards that reveal actual events that happened to fur traders (both Americans and American Indians) at Fort Clark.

-- Preparing for the Expedition What did Lewis and Clark pack when they were embarking on the trip of a lifetime? Surprisingly a lot of the stuff they brought on the Expedition is similar to things we pack for our vacations today. Students will compare and contrast reproduction items that Lewis and Clark brought to their own experiences and see how closely the lists line up.


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